Manstein: Hitler’s Greatest General – Mungo Melvin

I can’t remember buying this book and it’s been sitting on my “to read” pile gathering dust for ages so I decided now was the time to get round to reading it.

I’m pretty sure I bought it wanting to learn more about the Nazi campaigns in the East. I should probably have checked out the author before buying it.

Some historians/biographers are great at telling stories and bringing their subject to life. Others are not and this book fell into the latter category for me.

I bought a biography rather than a book of the battles because I’m interested in people. What I got was factual information about von Manstein and a lot a battle detail I didn’t really want. It made it a very chewy book!

I did find out a lot from persisting and finishing the book: I didn’t know Hindenburg was Manstein’s uncle. I didn’t know how fraught the relationship was between Hitler and von Manstein. I didn’t know what happened to the Generals and Field Marshalls Hitler sacked. Most of all I learned more about the constraints Hitler’s distrust of the officer corps imposed on the Wehrmacht.

However, given that this is an account of some serious battles of WW2 the book is completely lacking any recognition of the suffering of front line soldiers on the Eastern Front and fails to acknowledge the scale of death and serious injury of these men.

If I’d known this book was written by a retired General I probably wouldn’t have bought it, rightly assuming it would be a detailed book of facts and events rather than about bringing a person to life. I’m pleased in a way I did buy it and did read it in its entirety. It has increased my knowledge. But it became a chore rather than a pleasure to read.

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