Blitzed; Drugs in Nazi Germany – Norman Ohler

I saw this booked reviewed in one of the weekend papers and put it on my book “wish list”; two months before my birthday I put books onto my wish list rather than rush out and buy them or my partner grumbles that he doesn’t know what to buy me!  And then it came up as a 99p Kindle book deal.  As regular readers will know I can’t resist 99p bargains.

Having read the book I now know I will be leaving it on my wish list so I have an actual book version.

I thought the book start off slowly looking at the development of methamphetamine by a German chemist and the large-scale use of Pervitin as a cure-all during the period of the Weimar Republic.  There was a slightly odd diversion into the author’s visit to the Temmler laboratory where the drug was manufactured, which didn’t really make sense in the context of the opening chapter.

Once the book got going though I was thoroughly absorbed in it, much to the amusement of colleagues who I was on a residential course with, whose comments were along the lines of “Gillian’s doing drugs again!”

So, why was the book so absorbing?  I think, primarily, because it isn’t a topic that has been covered in any depth in my previous reading.  Also, because it is a mixture of personal stories and an overview; the reader gets to know about the people as well as the context and the “what”.  The idea of performance enhancing drugs being used to facilitate blitzkrieg also makes sense.  I also loved the story about the BBC doing an article, during the war, about blitzkrieg only being possible because of the use of drugs; because it gave the British population a reason why the German Army appeared invincible and inexhaustible they became exhaustible and defeatable.  The downside of the article was the start of the use of benzedrine by Allied forces.

I found the bit about Hitler’s decent into drug addiction less interesting although it does give a different insight into the man and his increasing narrow band of cronies.

The most frustrating thing about the book is its ending.  It just ends with the suicide of Hitler and the later death of Dr Morrell.  I want to know what happened after the war ended.  If you have an army who are addicted to, by that stage, fairly high doses of methamphetamine what happens to them?  Are they weaned off the drug?  Do they have to go cold-turkey?  Are their studies within Germany on the long-term after effects?  And I’m left in limbo not knowing!

That said, I would definitely recommend this book if you’re interested in German history, the history of drugs and drug taking and the tactics of war.

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