Eleanor of Castile – Sara Cockerill

Before I read this book I didn’t know who Eleanor of Castile was or which of the medieval English kings she was married to.

Turns out she was married to Edward I and had a busy and eventful life.  Although not much of Eleanor’s life is recorded Sara Cockerill has inferred a good history from what is recorded and what is recorded about her family and dependents.

I certainly didn’t expect to learn about the Spanish Reconquista from book about an English queen, although I guess the clue is in the title!  Her father, Ferdinand III of Castile, was instrumental in reconquering Spain from the Moors.

I also learned that this Eleanor was great-great-granddaughter of Eleanor of Aquitaine, one of my heroines of the Middle Ages.  And this Eleanor had some of the intellect, business acumen and stamina of her grandmother.  She was also very well-educated for the era; both her father and half-brother, Alfonso, were patrons of the arts and encouraged literacy in their courts.

During the early years of Eleanor’s marriage to the future Edward I she appears to have struggled with her mother-in-law who wanted to retain her influence over her son Edward.  However, the young couple were soon sent to Gascony to manage the royal duchy and then went on crusade to Acre.

The overall picture that is create of Eleanor through this biography is of a busy, business-like Queen and a close Royal couple.  Eleanor was a successful businesswoman in her own right, accumulating property and managing it whilst travelling around supporting her husband.  Yet her business dealings didn’t always make her popular.  She was also well-loved by her husband and mourned by him even when he later remarried; imagine how his second wife must have felt attending mourning services for her predecessor with her new husband!

I really enjoyed finding out more about the Middle Ages.  This book fills in some of my gaps between Eleanor of Aquitaine and the start of the Wars of the Roses.

It’s also fascinating to speculate on how England might have been different if we’d had King Alphonso I instead of Edward II.

Which, sort of, leads on the one of the downsides of this book and that is that a lot of it is about what we can infer from the records there are.  On some things it can be very clear; there is plenty of evidence that Eleanor accumulated a lot of property in England and some evidence that she was actively involved in managing it herself.  But it is quite hard to pin down the person behind the facts so Eleanor isn’t really knowable as a person.

I would, however, still recommend this book as an insight into the Queen whose heart is buried in Lincoln and who was sincerely mourned by the King who erected crosses wherever her body rested on its journey from Lincoln to London.

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