Vice Versa – Plautus via Phil Porter for RSC

A new play by Phil Porter based on the Roman comedies by Plautus with the snappy subtitle of “The decline & fall of General Braggadocio at the hands of his canny servant Dexter & Terence the monkey”!

Knowing the plot wouldn’t spoil your enjoyment of this farce and is, more or less; General Braggadocio has taken Voluptua as his prisoner and made her his concubine.  She is really in love with Valentin, who has left Greece and is staying with the General’s neighbour to find a way to rescue her.  Valentin’s servant, Dexter, has also been kidnapped and enslaved by Braggadocio.  Dexter plans to rescue herself, Voluptua and Valentin by getting Voluptua to pretend to have a twin sister who is madly in love with the General.  After various twists and turns the three escape and Braggadocio is left broke and thwarted.

I always enjoy productions in the Swan when the cast start interacting with the audience before the play starts.  This one started with a con-merchant “selling” gold from inside his coat, a politician handing out leaflets and a sketch artist drawing members of the audience.  It was somehow inevitable that Michael would end up being one of the people being sketched and he is now the proud (?) possessor of a picture of Michelangelo’s David with his head on it, signed by Pysipos!

The play started with a colourful, musical pageant onto stage and set the scene well for what followed.

Felix Hayes was a wonderfully over the top Braggadocio, Sophia Nomvete an excellent Dexter and Geoffrey Lumb a remarkably dim Valentin.

The staging was reasonably simple without any of the props intruding on the action, which is unusual for a farce, and set the scene well.

The most disconcerting part of the play was Kim Hartman as Climax.  She has aged very well and it’s really hard to not still see her as Helga in ‘Allo ‘Allo.  It must be frustrating for her but she is so recognisable…and I wish I’d aged as well as her!

All in all I would say that this play is fun, frivolous and funny.  And fairly forgettable.  I would see it again.  And it would make me laugh all over again.  But it isn’t a play to make you think or ponder.

Click here for link to RSC “about the play”

Click here to find out more about Plautus

 

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